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Aetobatus narinari Spotted eagle ray

Aetobatus narinariis commonly referred to as Spotted eagle ray. Difficulty in the aquarium: Not suitable for home aquaria!. Toxicity: Toxic hazard unknown.


Profilbild Urheber Richard und Mary Field, Malta

Copyright Richard Field, Jeddah, Saudi-Arabien


Courtesy of the author Richard und Mary Field, Malta

Uploaded by AndiV.

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lexID:
2649 
AphiaID:
217426 
Scientific:
Aetobatus narinari 
German:
Gefleckter Adlerrochen 
English:
Spotted Eagle Ray 
Category:
Stingrays 
Family tree:
Animalia (Kingdom) > Chordata (Phylum) > Elasmobranchii (Class) > Myliobatiformes (Order) > Myliobatidae (Family) > Aetobatus (Genus) > narinari (Species) 
Initial determination:
(Euphrasen, ), 1790 
Occurrence:
American Samoa, Amphidrom fish, Brackish water, Christmas Islands, Circumtropic, Cook Islands, Corea, East-Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Oman / Oman, Hawaii, Japan, Johnston Atoll, Kiribati, Madagascar, Marquesas Islands, Mauritius, Midway Islands, Ogasawara Islands, Pitcairn Islands, Réunion , Salt water, Samoa, Socotra Arch, Taiwan, The Chagos Archipelago (the Chagos Islands), the Cocos Islands / Keeling Islands, West-Atlantic Ocean, Yemen 
Sea depth:
1 - 80 Meter 
Size:
up to 129.92" (330 cm) 
Weight:
230 kg 
Temperature:
°F - 80.6 °F (°C - 27°C) 
Food:
Clam meat, Clams, Crabs, Fish (little fishes), Schrimps, Sepia, Shrimps, Snails, Worms 
Difficulty:
Not suitable for home aquaria! 
Offspring:
Not available as offspring 
Toxicity:
Toxic hazard unknown 
CITES:
Not evaluated 
Red List:
Endangered (EN) 
Related species at
Catalog of Life:
 
Author:
Publisher:
Meerwasser-Lexikon.de
Created:
Last edit:
2021-06-01 19:56:45 

Info

(Euphrasen, 1790)

Distribution:
Western Atlantic: North Carolina (summer) and Florida, USA and Bermuda to southern Brazil. Throughout Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean, including Antilles.

Eastern Atlantic: Mauritania to Angola.
Indo-West Pacific: Red Sea and South Africa to Hawaii, north to Japan, south to Australia.

Eastern Pacific: Gulf of California to Puerto Pizarro, Peru and the Galapagos Islands.
There may be more than one species of spotted Aetobatus.
Based on combined genealogical concordance and genetic distance criteria.

Biology:
Commonly found in shallow inshore waters such as bays and coral reefs but may cross oceanic basins.
Benthopelagic, found near land at 1-60 m. Sometimes enters estuaries.
Swims close to the surface, occasionally leaping out of the water, or close to the bottom. Frequently forming large schools during the non-breeding season.
Feeds mainly on bivalves but also eats shrimps, crabs, octopus and worms, whelks, and small fishes.
Ovoviviparous, flesh edible.
Over 3 m disc width and up to 880 cm total length if the long tail is undamaged.
Bears young in litters of 2-4.
Tail used as a decorative item.
Common catch of the demersal tangle net, bottom trawl, inshore gillnet and, to a lesser extent, demersal longline fisheries.
Utilized for its meat and cartilage.

Synonymised taxa:
Aetobates narinari (Euphrasen, 1790) (misspelling)
Aetobatis latirostris Duméril, 1861
Aetobatis narinari (Euphrasen, 1790) (misspelling)
Myliobatis eeltenkee Rüppell, 1837
Myliobatis macroptera McClelland, 1841
Myliobatis punctatus Maclay & Macleay, 1886
Raia quinqueaculeata Quoy & Gaimard, 1824
Raja narinari Euphrasen, 1790
Stoasodon narinari (Euphrasen, 1790)

External links

  1. Animal Diversity Web (en). Abgerufen am 01.06.2021.
  2. FishBase (multi). Abgerufen am 19.08.2020.
  3. Hamburger Abendblatt (de). Abgerufen am 19.08.2020.
  4. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (multi). Abgerufen am 01.06.2021.
  5. World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS) (en). Abgerufen am 19.08.2020.

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