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Suezichthys russelli Russell's wrasse

Suezichthys russelliis commonly referred to as Russell's wrasse. Difficulty in the aquarium: There are no reports available yet that this animal has already been kept in captivity successfully. Toxicity: Toxic hazard unknown.


Profilbild Urheber Dr. John Ernest (Jack) Randall (†), Hawaii

Foto: Ras Abu-Galum, Sinai, Golf von Akaba, Ägypten

5,65cm Gesamtlänge / aus der John and Helen Randall Slide Collection
Courtesy of the author Dr. John Ernest (Jack) Randall (†), Hawaii Please visit hbs.bishopmuseum.org for more information.

Uploaded by AndiV.

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lexID:
13964 
AphiaID:
219065 
Scientific:
Suezichthys russelli 
German:
Russells Lippfisch 
English:
Russell's Wrasse 
Category:
Wrasses 
Family tree:
Animalia (Kingdom) > Chordata (Phylum) > Actinopterygii (Class) > Perciformes (Order) > Labridae (Family) > Suezichthys (Genus) > russelli (Species) 
Initial determination:
Randall, 1981 
Occurrence:
East Africa, Egypt, Endemic species, Gulf of Aqaba / Gulf of Eliat, Kenya, Red Sea, Somalia, Western Indian Ocean 
Sea depth:
80 - 130 Meter 
Size:
2.36" - 2.76" (6,5cm - 7,5cm) 
Temperature:
25,1 °F - 28,6 °F (25,1°C - 28,6°C) 
Food:
Zooplankton 
Difficulty:
There are no reports available yet that this animal has already been kept in captivity successfully 
Offspring:
Not available as offspring 
Toxicity:
Toxic hazard unknown 
CITES:
Not evaluated 
Red List:
Data deficient (DD) 
Related species at
Catalog of Life:
 
More related species
in this lexicon:
 
Author:
Publisher:
Meerwasser-Lexikon.de
Created:
Last edit:
2021-06-22 10:53:25 

Info

What do the Voeltzkow chameleon (Furcifer voeltzkowi) and the wrasse Suezichthys russelli probably have in common?
Suezichthys russelli was considered an extinct species for 100 years and was accidentally rediscovered on Madagascar at the end of 2020, true to the motto "those who are believed to be dead live longer", there has not been a single discovery report of the wrasse Suezichthys russelli since its discovery in 1981, so perhaps another 60 years remain until the small wrasse is "seen again?".

Russell's wrasse was named in honor of Dr. Barry C. Russel, Curator Emeritus of the Museum & Art Gallery of the Northern Territory.
Dr. Russel first described the very rare wrasse Suezichthys soelae in 1985.

Suezichthys russelli has a lavender band on the head that extends from the corner of the operculum down to the preoperculum.
The iris of the eye is yellow and outlined in blue.

The wrasse has five dorsal scales; two cheek scale rows behind the eye, and three below the eye, the scales are large.
The bases of the dorsal and anal fins have a low scale mantle.

Information on the habitat or biology of the wrasse is unfortunately not available; according to WoRMS, the first description of Suezichthys russelli is not documented.


External links

  1. FishBase (multi). Abgerufen am 20.06.2021.
  2. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (multi). Abgerufen am 20.06.2021.
  3. World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS) (en). Abgerufen am 20.06.2021.

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