Anzeige
Fauna Marin GmbH All for Reef Tropic Marin Meerwasser24.de Tropic Marin Professionell Lab Whitecorals.com

Apogon brevispinis Cardinalfish

Apogon brevispinisis commonly referred to as Cardinalfish. Difficulty in the aquarium: There are no reports available yet that this animal has already been kept in captivity successfully. Toxicity: Toxic hazard unknown.


Profilbild Urheber Dr. John Ernest (Jack) Randall (†), Hawaii

Foto: Rangiroa, Tuamotu-Archipel, Französisch-Polynesien

09.04.1971
Courtesy of the author Dr. John Ernest (Jack) Randall (†), Hawaii . Please visit hbs.bishopmuseum.org for more information.

Uploaded by AndiV.

Image detail


Profile

lexID:
12873 
AphiaID:
272984 
Scientific:
Apogon brevispinis 
German:
Kardinalbarsch 
English:
Cardinalfish 
Category:
Cardinalfishes 
Family tree:
Animalia (Kingdom) > Chordata (Phylum) > Actinopterygii (Class) > Perciformes (Order) > Apogonidae (Family) > Apogon (Genus) > brevispinis (Species) 
Initial determination:
Fraser & Randall, 2003 
Occurrence:
Austral Islands, Caroline Island, Coral reefs, Eastern Pacific Ocean, French Polynesia, Guam, Micronesia, New Caledonia, Rangiroa, Tuamoto Islands, Western Pacific Ocean 
Sea depth:
46 - 58 Meter 
Size:
6,2 cm 
Temperature:
75.2 °F - 80.6 °F (24°C - 27°C) 
Food:
Amphipods, Copepods, Daphnia salina, Fish larvae, Invertebrates, Krill, Mysis, Zoanthids, Zoobenthos, Zooplankton 
Difficulty:
There are no reports available yet that this animal has already been kept in captivity successfully 
Offspring:
Not available as offspring 
Toxicity:
Toxic hazard unknown 
CITES:
Not evaluated 
Red List:
Not evaluated (NE) 
Related species at
Catalog of Life:
 
More related species
in this lexicon:
 
Author:
Publisher:
Meerwasser-Lexikon.de
Created:
Last edit:
2020-03-12 12:43:46 

Info

Apogon brevispinis was described in 2003 on the basis of two specimens, so there are currently no situ photos available.

This cardinalfish has alternating golden brown (tannin brown) and white stripes on its head and body, a white stripe stretching into the first two anal rays.
The eponymous, tiny first dorsal fin spine has only a length of about 5-8% of the third dorsal spine.

A dark caudal spot can be seen at the base of the tail.

Habitat. These specimens were collected on a coral slope of 45° with very little sand.
The lack of additional material and photos suggests that this species usually lives below the typical depths for conventional SCUBA units.

Etymology. From the Latin words "brevis" for short and "spina" for spine, which refers to the tiny first dorsal spine.

Synonyms:
Ostorhinchus brevispinis (Fraser & Randall, 2003)
Apogon brevispiris (Fraser & Randall, 2003)

Pictures

Commonly


Husbandry know-how of owners

0 husbandary tips from our users available
Show all and discuss